The Pass Byron Bay

You are here

The Pass is a stretch of beach between Clarkes Beach and Wategos. Wide expanses of white sand and long clear waves invite you to take a dip or a stroll along the gently curving shoreline towards the Cape. 

The Pass is a famous surf beach and can be quite hazardous when the swell is big. As always, swim between the flags and leave the big waves to the professionals. It’s an idyllic place to laze away the day, people watch, catch or a glimpse of dolphins or whales.

Is The Pass beach is patrolled by lifesavers part of the year, please visit Byron Council's website for full details on the dates of patrolled beaches in Byron Shire.

Facilities

  • Showers
  • Toilets
  • BBQ’s
  • Picnic
  • Tables
  • Boat ramp Car park, $4 per vehicle per hour. Coin operated and credit card facilities available.

Surfing
The Pass is famous for it’s right-hand point breaks when the swell is good. At other times it is a good spot for all levels of surfers including beginners. Keep in mind that it is a popular surf beach and can be very busy. When the waves are big it is best left to more experienced surfers. Children and beginner surfers should only surf when the beach is patrolled. 

History
The Pass Midden. The NSW National Parks first recorded The Pass midden in Cape Byron State Conservation Area in 1980. In 2013 archeological midden material was repatriated and displayed on Country.

The pass has always been an important and sacred campsite for the Arakwal people. Through conservation and education the NPWS and Aboriginal community partners have determined to protect the precious history that is represented by The Pass Midden now and into the future.

Nearby Attractions 

Fisherman’s Lookout
Follow the stairs up the rocky outcrop on the beach to Fisherman’s Lookout. The timber viewing platform is perfect for enjoying a panoramic view of the ocean, the surfers, and whales and dolphins in season.

Cape Byron Lighthouse
The Byron Bay Lighthouse was built in 1901 and looks over Byron today illuminating land and sea. Beneath the 22 metres high tower sits a Maritime Museum and a cluster of cottages that are available for holiday letting. 

Cape Byron Walking Track
A 3.7 km loop that takes about 2 hours to complete. The track meanders through rainforest and over cliff tops providing stunning views of the ocean and the hinterland.

Cape Byron Information Centre
Find out all the information you need to make your visit to the Cape Byron State Conservation Area and the Cape Byron Marine Park a truly wonderful experience. Facilities include toilets, picnic tables, drinking water, café/kiosk and car park. Open 9.30 – 4.30 everyday except Christmas Day.

Whale Watching
Bring your binoculars for an exhilarating experience during whale watching season. You will spot both humpback and southern right whales heading north for warmer waters during June and July and the returning south from September to November.

Lighthouse Tours
Bound for Cape Byron Lighthouse tour is a 2 hour, 1km walking tour around Cape Byron. You will be guided by a knowledgeable NPWS guide. There is also a Byron Bay historic private lighthouse tour for those who have an interest in the history of the lighthouse. These tours take 45 minutes and are available between 8.45am and 3.30pm Monday to Friday.

Julian Rocks Marine Reserve
Lying 2.5km from the shore Julian Rocks Marine Reserve is an extension of Cape Byron separated by water. The area was named by Captain Cook in 1776. An abundance of marine life exists around the rocks including sea turtles, rays, corals and over 500 species of fish and marine life.

Different creatures can be seen around the rocks depending on the season and water temperature variations. The boat trip out to the rocks is also a wonderful experience with dolphins often accompanying the boat. Between May and September whales may also be seen.

There are many different levels of dives on offer for both experienced and amateur divers.

Frequently Asked Questions or FAQ's

What do the flags mean on the beach?
The most important flags on the beach are the red and yellow flags. These show the supervised area of the beach and that a lifesaving service is operating. If there are no red and yellow flags, you should not go swimming.

How long is The Pass?
800 metres

How far is The Pass from town?
By road 2.2km or a 5 minute drive. On foot 2.2km or a 30 minute walk.

When is The Pass patrolled by lifesavers?
please visit Byron Council's website for full details on the dates of patrolled beaches in Byron Shire.

Is The Pass good for surfing?
The Pass is famous for it’s right-hand point breaks when the swell is good. Children and beginner surfers should only surf when the beach is patrolled.

Is The Pass good for children?
Yes when the waves are small. Children should always swim between the flags on a patrolled beach.

Are there showers at The Pass?
Yes.

Do you have to pay for parking? 
Yes. Car park $4 per vehicle per hour. Coin operated and credit card facilities available.

How long does it take to walk from Main Beach to The Pass?
About 30 minutes along the beach.

Are there toilets?
Yes.

What is the Beach Hazard Rating for The Pass?
4/10 (moderately hazardous)

Is The Pass dog friendly?
No.
 

Have a question or need help? Please Contact Us